Yukon License Plates 1969-present

YT 69 #2389
Yukon Territory 1969 passenger issue. This plate features an embossed prospector graphic to the left of serial with a small dot of gold paint in his miner's pan. This motif was first introduced in 1953, as was the slogan "Land of the Midnight Sun". Yukon plates of this era were all numeric. These plates, as well as all issues through 1977 were produced in British Columbia and used the same dies as British Columbia plates of the same era.
YT 70 #5576
Yukon Territory 1970 passenger issue. Same format as above, this plate marked the last year for the "Land of the Midnight Sun" slogan.
YT 71 #201
Yukon Territory 1971 passenger issue. The new slogan "Home of the Klondike" was introduced on this plate, referring to the Klondike River which runs through the territory.
YT 72 #2981
Yukon Territory 1972 passenger issue. Same format as 1971, in light green on white colors.
YT 73 #4450
Yukon Territory 1973 passenger issue. Plates were issued in a black on tan color scheme for 1973, same format as the 1971 and 1972 issues otherwise.
YT 74 #3568
Yukon Territory 1974 passenger issue. Also following the format of 1971-72, this plate used a slightly darker green than the 1972 plate.
YT 75 #1173
Yukon Territory 1975 passenger issue. Same colors and format as the 1971 issue. This was the last year for all-numeric serials on Yukon passenger plates.
YT 76 #L204
Yukon Territory 1976 passenger issue. The numbering format on these plates was changed to an A123 format, with the first letter indicating the region of the territory where the plate was issued. Plates with an "L" prefix were issued in the Whitehorse area, which is by far the largest in the territory.
YT 77 #R565
Yukon Territory 1977 passenger issue. Same format as the 1976 issue. I do not have a reference to "R" as a geographic prefix, but it is likely to also be a Whitehorse area issue. This was the last year of the "Home of the Klondike" slogan, the A123 serial format, and British Columbia's dies for the serial.
YT 78 #JP-73
Yukon Territory 1978 passenger issue. This year saw several changes to the basic plate design, including a shortening of the slogan to just "The Klondike", a smaller prospector image, and a new AB-12 serial format. The first letter still indicated area, with "J" being yet another Whitehorse plate. Starting with this issue and running through 1990, Yukon plates were produced in Saskatchewan, using the same dies as the Saskatchewan wheat graphic plates of the time.
YT 79 #AB42
Yukon Territory 1979 passenger issue. Same basic format as 1978, this was the final yearly issue for Yukon. Early issues on this base did not contain the dash in the serial. Again, the A prefix indicated the Whitehorse region of the Territory.
YT 79 #GJ-54
Yukon Territory 1979 passenger issue. Later issue with the dash replaced in the serial. The "G" on the plate indicates area, but with no reference in the ALPCA archives I'm only guessing that it too was issued to Whitehorse.
YT 81 #BJ-90
Yukon Territory 1981 passenger issue (1980 base). This baseplate added sticker boxes to the bottom of the plate and was used through 1980 without stickers, then through the end of 1981 with a sticker. This was the last issue to attempt area coding on the plates, with the "B" prefix again being for Whitehorse (where else?)
YT 81 #KL-78
Yukon Territory 1981 passenger issue. Later issues of this plate, issued and used in 1981, dropped the embossed "80" date from the plate. These undated bases also had much wider bolt slots than the previous dated plates.
YT 82 #AJG-9
Yukon Territory 1982 passenger issue. These plates were issued at the end of 1981 and were used through the end of 1984. All plates carried an "82" sticker, but there was no "83" sticker issued. A new ABC-1 serial format was introduced on this baseplate, with the serial being issued in order with no coding involved. Many letters were skipped in the sequence, and no double letters were allowed, among other oddities about the order of issuance. Early plates in this series featured these gigantic bolt slots.
YT 82 #DOK-1
Yukon Territory 1982 passenger issue. Minor variation on this base, the large bolt slots seen on the previous plates were switched to smaller ones over the course of this plate's issuance. This may have been due to the large slots allowing the plate to slip off its bolts too easily - Michigan had a similar "buttonhole" issue with wide slots during the mid-80s as well.
YT 90 #GPJ-3
Yukon Territory 1990 passenger issue. This base was used from 1985 through 1990, and carried on the ABC-1 format from where the 1982 base left off. The miner has no gold in his pan for the first time on this issue, probably since the whole background of the plate was gold in color.
YT 92 #AAT77
Yukon Territory 1992 passenger issue. These new plates were introduced at the end of 1991 and remain the current Yukon issue today. These feature a screened full-color prospector in the background and use an ABC12 serial format. These plates are manufactured by Astrographics Industries in British Columbia and use the same dies as most of BC's current provincial flag baseplates. This marked the first time since 1977 that Yukon used BC dies on their plates. The 1992 expiration sticker was white on bright yellow, making the "92" virtually impossible to read at any sort of distance.
YT 92 #BAP 30
Yukon Territory 1992 passenger issue. Another of the current series plates, some issues on this base seem to be lined up with a small space between the letters and numbers, while others are not.
YT 03 #AZK83
Yukon Territory 2003 passenger issue. Newer variation of the current baseplate. Sometime in 2001, the contract for producing these plates apparently shifted from Astrographics in British Columbia to another vendor, likely HiSigns in Alberta. This may have corresponded with British Columbia's contract switch from Astrographics to a different vendor. These newer Yukon plates carry a different die set, looking like a crisper version of dies that HiSigns has used on many Alberta issues over the years. The graphic is also slightly different, with smaller characters used for the slogan, and a slightly shorter miner. These plates are apparently issued in some sort of odd letter-block sequence, with all the recent ones I've seen carrying serials in the Axx or Bxx series.

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Last Modified 7/15/2007 (added first 1979 plate).